Passages | The Hero with a Thousand Faces

 Unknown“The agony of breaking through personal limitations is the agony of spiritual growth. Art, literature, myth and cult, philosophy, and ascetic disciplines are instruments to help the individual past his limiting horizons into spheres of ever-expanding realization. As he crosses threshold after threshold, conquering dragon after dragon, the stature of the divinity that he summons to his highest wish increases, until it subsumes the cosmos. Finally, the mind breaks the bounding sphere of the cosmos to a realization transcending all experiences of form – all symbolizations, all divinities: a realization of the ineluctable void.”

 

Passages: Texts, Contexts, and the Ways to Wisdom

The Hero with a Thousand Faces

Tuesday, September 26, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm
Auditorium
Guided Discussion with President Greg Salyer, Ph.D.

There’s a Story Behind That: Twin Peaks Panel Discussion

Passages | The Bhagavad Gita

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“The man who sees me in everything and everything within me will not be lost to me, nor will I ever be lost to him. He who is rooted in oneness realizes that I am in every being; wherever he goes, he remains in me. When he sees all being as equal in suffering or in joy because they are like himself, that man has grown perfect in yoga.”

 

Passages: Texts, Contexts, and the Ways to Wisdom

The Bhagavad Gita

Tuesday, September 12, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm
Auditorium
Guided Discussion with President Greg Salyer, Ph.D.

“There’s a Story Behind That”: Panel Discussion of Twin Peaks

lpYou’ve pondered it, argued over it, been confused by it, reveled in it, and marveled over it. Come and do all those things with us after the season is over by attending a panel discussion of this “strange and wonderful” return of Twin Peaks.

Panelists:

  • Greg Salyer, Ph.D., President, UPR
  • David Orr, Art Curator/Artist-in-Residence, UPR
  • Gustavo Turner, Ph.D., Los Angeles Writer and Photographer
 plus special guest: Carel Struycken, “The Fireman”

Sunday, September 10, 2017
Auditorium
5:00-6:30 pm

 

Doughnuts, Pie, and Damn Fine Coffee will be served!

 

Finding Your Way Back Home with Jonathan Young, Ph.D.

Finding_Your_Way

LittleRedDoorSaturday, September 16th, 2017

A six-hour seminar with Jonathan Young and Anne Bach 

Also available as a Webinar

The University of Philosophical Research

3910 Los Feliz Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90027

From the realms of magic and dream come tales of wonder. This seminar enters the mythic imagination to explore the journey toward wholeness. Surprising guidance can be drawn from stories about finding ourselves in unfamiliar experiences. We will discuss Hansel & Gretel and Little Red Riding Hood to see how such initiatory adventures can help in our quests.

In a spirit of play, we will follow these enchanting tales to learn more about the lessons of the forest journeys. Mythic stories can teach us about the riches of the inner life. Characters from folklore and mythology can reveal the patterns in our own lives and connect us with dimensions beyond ordinary experience. The key is in the psychological symbolism of the tales. For example, we will take a close look at the many meanings of a visit to the wise old woman of the woods.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize how stories can help in the search for fulfillment
  • Detect psychological patterns reflected in forest adventures
  • Identify how plot stages mirror key development tasks
  • 

Demonstrate how narrative tasks can clarify specific life challenges
  • Explain the use of dream analysis methods to draw insights from favorite tales
  • Discuss methods of engaging the imagination to claim emotional resources

Instructors:

Jonathan Young, Ph.D., PSY10231, is a psychologist storyteller, and writer on mythic stories. He assisted mythologist Joseph Campbell at seminars and was the Founding Curator of the Joseph Campbell Archives and Library. His books and articles focus on personal mythology. Dr. Young is on the faculty of the University of Philosophical Research.     

Anne Bach, M.S., MFT 38891, is a specialist in uses of writing in psychotherapy. She gives presentations on creativity as inner work at major conferences, and lectures widely on psychological dimensions of expressive writing. Her clinical background includes poetry therapy with residential mentally ill patients.   

Tuition: 

In person: $140 with CE credit   ~   $95 non-credit

Webinar: $95 with CE credit   ~   $45 non-credit

Day Schedule

9:30 – Check-in begins.
10:00 - The folktale as window to the world within
- The fairytale as window to the unconscious
11:15 – Break (approximate time)
11:30 - Adult development reflected in forest tales
12:30 – Lunch Break – On your own, please return on time
1:30 - Plot and role in lived narratives
2:30 – Break (approximate time)
2:40 – Unconscious dynamics in the mythic imagination
3:50 – Break (approximate time)
4:00 - Stories and inner work
5:00 – Course concludes – Be sure to sign out

CE Credit Information:

The material is presented at an introductory level, requiring no background in mythic studies, narrative theory, or Jungian psychology. Non-credit: Those not needing verification of attendance, such as teachers, writers, clergy, and artists – are welcome as non-credit attendees. Spouses, friends, students, and others not needing verification of attendance can also choose the lower non-credit tuition.

Counts as a real-time in-person course (not home-study) for Psychology, MFT, LCSW, LPCC, etc : 6 CE hours, Nursing: 7 hours. Most teachers must get credits approved by their school administration. Credits are provided by the Center for Story and Symbol. Center courses meet the requirements in most states.

Psychology ~ The Center for Story and Symbol is approved by the American Psychology Association to sponsor continuing education hours for psychologists. The Center maintains responsibility for these programs and their contents. CE hours are accepted by the California MCEP program. Full attendance is required for psychologists – no partial credit.

MFT, LCSW, LPCC ~ California BBS Provider Number PCE 3903  RN ~ Provider approved by the Calif. Board of Registered Nursing, BRN Provider Number CEP 12477.

Teachers ~ Continuing Education courses are customarily approved by immediate supervisors. It is usually sufficient for teachers to attend on a non-credit (auditing) basis and present a receipt for the course.

*Discounted tuition is available for UPR Students and Alumni. Please phone 323-663-2167 for pricing.


Finding Your Way Back Home — Click for Tuition Options:



UPR on Campus | Summer 2017 | Passages: Texts, Contexts, and the Ways to Wisdom

UPR_passages 600

GREG SALYER, PH.D is the President of the University of Philosophical Research. He has been a teacher and administrator in higher education for almost twenty-five years. He has a Ph.D. in Literary theory, Contemporary Literature, and Religious Studies from Emory University’s Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts and has taught in many venues, from small liberal arts colleges to a major research university, and online since 2000.

Passages is a free, ten-part, guided discussion offered by the University of Philosophical Research to all.

Second Saturday Speaker’s Platform | President Greg Salyer | Making Meaning in 2017

Meaning

It is an unprecedented time in American and world history. Democratic institutions are threatened and appear to be waning while the problems they were created to address are worse than ever. Ennui and angst are prominent if not dominant, and it seems that our social interactions are increasingly poisonous. The public sphere has become a mutual shouting match, and our politics are locked into the same intransigent and vituperative rhetoric. As W.B. Yeats put it, “The best lack all conviction, while the worst/Are full of passionate intensity.” He would go on to say that some revelation must be at hand. Is it? Do we need a revelation, a new vision? If so, what might it look like? What do the ancient wisdom teachers have to say about all of this? How do we make meaning in 2017 and beyond?

 

 

UPR on Campus: The Meanings of America: The Future Nation

future

Illumined: Mystical and Philosophical Texts Transformed into Art

ILLUMINED

by

David Orr

 Tuesday · July 11, 2017 · 7 PM-8:30 PM

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Join L.A. artist David Orr as he discusses his latest project ILLUMINED at the University of Philosophical Research. David has been photographing mystical and philosophical texts from the UPR library collection — often one-of-a-kind, hand-printed and illuminated manuscripts — then recombining the results into abstract forms which allude to their worldview and beyond. The end images evoke the Daoist idea that “the deepest truths can never be captured by words alone.”

David will share ideas which informed this project, including: uncanny similarities in visual depictions of the universe across cultures; how ancient Eastern philosophies and cutting-edge quantum physics arrive at the same conclusions; and how symmetry, long employed in scientific, secular and spiritual iconography to invoke unattainable order, originates in natural phenomena both visible and invisible to us.

(bio)

David Orr is an artist whose work has been shown extensively in the United States and internationally, in shows juried by representatives from the de Young Museum, International Center for Photography, the Lucie Awards, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The New Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. His work is in public collections among Ansel Adams, John Baldessari, Jim Dine, David Hockney, The Brothers Quay, Edward Weston, and Joel-Peter Witkin.

His work has appeared in Art Daily, Buzzfeed, Communication Arts, Graphis, Hyperallergic, The Photo Review, Print, The Art Director’s Club, The Society of Publication Designers, VICE, and VICTOR: The Hasselblad Magazine. Independent film projects have aired on Channel 4 Britain and PBS, and David has juried the AICP and Monitor awards. He speaks about his work regularly at such venues as CSU LA, The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Death Salon, The Director’s Guild of America, Dublintellectual, The Mütter Museum, The New School, Parsons School of Design, Reed College, and UCLA.

UPR on Campus: The Meanings of America

Meanings of America

Jasper
Johns, 1930-, Three Flags, 1958

Greg Salyer, Ph.D.
President
University of Philosophical Research

To continue the discussion online and to view resources on the topics,
write Dr. Greg Salyer at gregsalyer@uprs.edu for
access to our UPR on Campus site.

Tuesday Lectures Thursday Films
The Native Nation

Tuesday, April 25, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

Before there was “America,” there was a continent of more than 500 nations and cultures varying widely in language, religion, and social structure. They practiced sophisticated land management, created a vast network of roads, and constructed large cities rivaling those of Europe. When the Europeans invaded, these 500 nations became one in the new American imagination, los indios or “the Indians.” The name arose from a mistake in navigation and remained as a mistake of the imagination to this day. Despite a calculated and prolonged genocide by Euro-Americans, Native people remain on the continent and survive through their ceremonies and humor.

Watch the lecture on Vimeo

Smoke Signals

Thursday, April 27, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

The Religious Nation

Tuesday, May 2, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

America’s creation myth is about religious freedom from a Europe still bleeding from its religious wars that were tied to state-sponsored religion. Members of the Plymouth Colony landed in Massachusetts in 1620 and provided a religious counterpart to the Virginia Company that had settled in Jamestown in 1607. The Plymouth Colony’s “freedom from” religion of the state and “freedom to” practice their own beliefs remains a pivotal tension at the heart of the America as a religious nation. The First Amendment of the Constitution articulates this paradox: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof . . . .”

Watch the lecture/discussion on YouTube

The Crucible

Thursday, May 4, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

The Immigrant Nation
Tuesday, May 9, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

The meaning of America has been articulated since its beginning in the Latin phrase e pluribus unum, out of many, one. The many, of course, are immigrants. The one is harder to imagine and realize. This three-word myth assumes an America that is open and secure, diverse and unified, and constantly changing and fundamentally stable. That is an idealistic and perhaps impossible goal for a community, much less a nation of this size. A symbol that is usually associated with this myth is the melting pot, which appears instructive on the surface until we begin to ask questions of it. Who is doing the melting, and what is the result? What is lost and what is gained in the melting? Is it language, culture, identity? Such questions are more pressing than ever as the myth of the immigrant nation undergoes unique challenges and revisions.

The Immigrant

Thursday, May 11, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

The Destined Nation
Tuesday, May 16, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

It has been argued that the myth of the American West is the longest-lived of the American myths. Expansion to the Pacific Ocean represented a culmination of the colonization of the continent and finalized the nation-building that began with contact. In fact, Frederick Jackson Turner called the settling of the frontier the second founding of the republic, and this consummation of the myth of destiny did not end at the western ocean. Instead, it continued to grow into the nation’s first foreign policy doctrine of Manifest Destiny, a mythologically loaded phrase if there ever was one. Less of a consensus than the melting pot, Manifest Destiny nevertheless provided an ideology of American colonization and war that found
particular expression around the globe.

Dead Man

Thursday, May 18, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm
The Self-Reliant Nation
Tuesday, May 23, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

Mythologies have heroes, and the American mythology has a hero at its center. That hero is you, the American. This hero myth is not reserved for noble ones or founders of cities, as in ancient mythology. Part of the American mythology is that the hero myth is available to all by their birthright as Americans. The myth connects to the nerve centers of the American mythos: individualism (and new spaces and resources in which to practice it), self-reliance, rags to riches, the American dream, and American exceptionalism. Moreover, the hero myth finds a home in everything from the American farmer to the American philosopher. Even those who had been excluded from the American dream by previous bigotry can (mythologically at least) become an American hero.

American Beauty
Thursday, May 25, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm
The Capitalist Nation
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

There is a good chance that any time a concept is presented as natural, self-evident, or inevitable we are talking about a myth. As Roland Barthes noted, “Myth transforms history into nature.” This observation is uniquely true of capitalism in America. The American Dream is a “self-evident” capitalist dream, thanks especially to popular novels of the nineteenth-century young adult writer Horatio Alger’s and his rags to riches myth. Any myth, however, must interface with other myths in the whole mythology. How does capitalism fare in this scheme? Surprisingly well, actually. In this lecture/discussion we will see just how and why capitalism is woven into the meanings of
America.

There Will be BloodThursday, June 1, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm
The Anti-Intellectual Nation
Tuesday, June 6, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

Like their Hebrew mythological forebears, the founders of America used the concept of the chosen nation to define themselves against the “others.” Among these others are Europeans, and a primary feature of European mythologies is what has been described as a certain intellectual elitism. Never mind that it was such intellectualism that conceived and inaugurated America in the beginning. The emergent and still-present myth of the “plain-spoken” and “simple” American has been plied into political power repeatedly and effectively. Why should a nation value anti-intellectualism and how does it play into the meanings of America? The answers may be surprising and revealing.

No screening Thursday, June 8. Watch Being There on your own and discuss it during the next lecture if you like.

The Violent Nation
Tuesday, June 13, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

Violence is the ritual practice of American myth. Given the belief that America was a “wilderness” that needed to be subdued, especially in regard to its Native people, violence becomes a sacrament of nation building and mythological regeneration. Congruent with the value of violence is the value of its tools, that is, arms. That America is and has been one of the most violent countries in history is directly related to the meaning and use of violence as establishing and renewing the meaning of America.

No screening Thursday, June 15. Watch Birth of a Nation on your own and discuss it during the next lecture if you like.

The Innocent Nation
Tuesday, June 20, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

While all nations avoid admitting complicity in nefarious acts, America has a unique approach to innocence that is drawn directly from the other meanings of America that we have been studying. Innocence is also related to another prominent meaning of America, that is, exceptional. Innocence and exceptionalism make for a powerful mythological identity that allows for Manifest Destiny and other mythologies to proceed without critique, or at least a critique that is recognized and accounted for. As such, it is a self-sustaining myth and also an extremely dangerous one both for citizens and the nation’s others.

No screening Thursday, June 22. Watch Forrest Gump on your own and discuss it during the next lecture if you like.

The Future Nation
Tuesday, June 27, 2017
7:00-8:30 pm

Given the meanings of America that we have explored, it is clear that American mythology is uniquely oriented toward the future. Even as the Pilgrims looked back over their shoulders at the religious wars they left behind, they looked forward to establishing themselves in this new “Promised Land.” The open frontier continued to fuel this myth, and when the frontier was “closed,” the future took on the contours of capitalism and eventually space exploration. Add in innocence and exceptionalism and we have a recipe for the future that is uniquely mythological and American. Even the world acknowledges (or used to) that the future is American, for better or for worse.

We have only one sign-up for Blade Runner, so the screening has been canceled. Thank you for your understanding.

http://doodle.com/poll/xk42m7wd2ysafbmi

 

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