Finding Your Way Back Home with Jonathan Young, Ph.D.

Finding_Your_Way

LittleRedDoorSaturday, September 16th, 2017

A six-hour seminar with Jonathan Young and Anne Bach 

Also available as a Webinar

The University of Philosophical Research

3910 Los Feliz Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90027

From the realms of magic and dream come tales of wonder. This seminar enters the mythic imagination to explore the journey toward wholeness. Surprising guidance can be drawn from stories about finding ourselves in unfamiliar experiences. We will discuss Hansel & Gretel and Little Red Riding Hood to see how such initiatory adventures can help in our quests.

In a spirit of play, we will follow these enchanting tales to learn more about the lessons of the forest journeys. Mythic stories can teach us about the riches of the inner life. Characters from folklore and mythology can reveal the patterns in our own lives and connect us with dimensions beyond ordinary experience. The key is in the psychological symbolism of the tales. For example, we will take a close look at the many meanings of a visit to the wise old woman of the woods.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize how stories can help in the search for fulfillment
  • Detect psychological patterns reflected in forest adventures
  • Identify how plot stages mirror key development tasks
  • 

Demonstrate how narrative tasks can clarify specific life challenges
  • Explain the use of dream analysis methods to draw insights from favorite tales
  • Discuss methods of engaging the imagination to claim emotional resources

Instructors:

Jonathan Young, Ph.D., PSY10231, is a psychologist storyteller, and writer on mythic stories. He assisted mythologist Joseph Campbell at seminars and was the Founding Curator of the Joseph Campbell Archives and Library. His books and articles focus on personal mythology. Dr. Young is on the faculty of the University of Philosophical Research.     

Anne Bach, M.S., MFT 38891, is a specialist in uses of writing in psychotherapy. She gives presentations on creativity as inner work at major conferences, and lectures widely on psychological dimensions of expressive writing. Her clinical background includes poetry therapy with residential mentally ill patients.   

Tuition: 

In person: $140 with CE credit   ~   $95 non-credit

Webinar: $95 with CE credit   ~   $45 non-credit

Day Schedule

9:30 – Check-in begins.
10:00 - The folktale as window to the world within
- The fairytale as window to the unconscious
11:15 – Break (approximate time)
11:30 - Adult development reflected in forest tales
12:30 – Lunch Break – On your own, please return on time
1:30 - Plot and role in lived narratives
2:30 – Break (approximate time)
2:40 – Unconscious dynamics in the mythic imagination
3:50 – Break (approximate time)
4:00 - Stories and inner work
5:00 – Course concludes – Be sure to sign out

CE Credit Information:

The material is presented at an introductory level, requiring no background in mythic studies, narrative theory, or Jungian psychology. Non-credit: Those not needing verification of attendance, such as teachers, writers, clergy, and artists – are welcome as non-credit attendees. Spouses, friends, students, and others not needing verification of attendance can also choose the lower non-credit tuition.

Counts as a real-time in-person course (not home-study) for Psychology, MFT, LCSW, LPCC, etc : 6 CE hours, Nursing: 7 hours. Most teachers must get credits approved by their school administration. Credits are provided by the Center for Story and Symbol. Center courses meet the requirements in most states.

Psychology ~ The Center for Story and Symbol is approved by the American Psychology Association to sponsor continuing education hours for psychologists. The Center maintains responsibility for these programs and their contents. CE hours are accepted by the California MCEP program. Full attendance is required for psychologists – no partial credit.

MFT, LCSW, LPCC ~ California BBS Provider Number PCE 3903  RN ~ Provider approved by the Calif. Board of Registered Nursing, BRN Provider Number CEP 12477.

Teachers ~ Continuing Education courses are customarily approved by immediate supervisors. It is usually sufficient for teachers to attend on a non-credit (auditing) basis and present a receipt for the course.

*Discounted tuition is available for UPR Students and Alumni. Please phone 323-663-2167 for pricing.


Finding Your Way Back Home — Click for Tuition Options:



Claiming Our Stories

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Swan at SunsetSaturday, September 10th, 2016

A six-hour seminar with Jonathan Young and Anne Bach. 

A sense of life-story can have a strong impact on our inner development. This course explores major themes in formative myths. We will look at how hidden motivations and expectations can shape the unfolding adventure. Such patterns influence perceptions, choices, and possibilities. Tales like The Ugly Duckling by Hans Christian Anderson are more than entertainments. They have guiding wisdom for how we see our own journeys. Life fulfillment can be seen as a project of creating a satisfactory biography. It is crucial to cultivate a vision that nurtures our best qualities. Central tasks include finding authenticity, being loyal to cherished values, and having compassion towards oneself and others. Integration involves cultivating a radical sense of acceptance of our stories as they are.

Learning Objectives

  1. Discern the shaping influence of life stories.
  2. Recognize how crises of faith, courage, and identity can be calls for renewal.
  3. Establish how reflecting on personal storyline can aid in the integration of competing goals.

Open to everyone. The course is not just for psychotherapists. It is open to all those interested in archetypal perspectives. The lectures are presented at the introductory level and require no background in mythology, narrative theory, or Jungian psychology. 


Instructors:

Jonathan Young, Ph.D., PSY10231, is a psychologist storyteller, and writer on mythic stories. He assisted mythologist Joseph Campbell at seminars and was the Founding Curator of the Joseph Campbell Archives and Library. His books and articles focus on personal mythology. Dr. Young is on the faculty of the University of Philosophical Research     

Anne Bach, M.S., MFT 38891 is a specialist in uses of writing in psychotherapy. She gives presentations on creativity as inner work at major conferences, and lectures widely on psychological dimensions of expressive writing. Her clinical background includes poetry therapy with residential mentally ill patients.   

Tuition: 

In person: $140 with CE credit   ~   $95 non-credit

Webinar: $95 with CE credit   ~   $45. non-credit

Call (323) 663-2167 ext. 112 to reserve your ticket over the phone or select one of the following to purchase tickets online:


Claiming Our Stories — Click for Tuition Options:



 For half-price tuition (students and UPR alumni only) please call (323) 663-2167 ext. 112

Day Schedule:

Checking-in begins at 9:30 a.m.

10:00 – Underlying Patterns in Life Stories

11:15 – Break (approximate time)

11:30 – Character as Identity and Purpose

12:30 – Lunch Break

1:30 – Cultivating the Richness of Destiny

2:30 – Break(approximate time)

2:50 – Harvesting the Layers of Emerging Narratives

3:50 – Break(approximate time)

4:00 – Story Work in Helping People

5:00 – Course concludes – Total 6 hours (RNs 7 hours)

CE Credit Information:

The material is presented at an introductory level, requiring no background in mythic studies, narrative theory, or Jungian psychology. Non-credit: Those not needing verification of attendance, such as teachers, writers, clergy, and artists – are welcome as non-credit attendees. Spouses, friends, students, and others not needing verification of attendance can also choose the lower non-credit tuition. 

Continuing Education hours are available for psychologists, marriage & family therapists, social workers, nurses, and other mental health professionals. The course meets CE requirements in most states. The certificate of completion will be provided by the Center for Story and Symbol. 

The following CE credits are available:

Psychology, MFT, LCSW, LPCC : 6 CE hours, Nursing: 7 hours. Most teachers must get credits approved by their school administration. Credits are provided by the Center for Story and Symbol. Center courses meet the requirements in most states. 

CE Hours: 

Psychology, MFT, LCSW, LPCC, Ed Psych: 6 CE hours   –   Nursing : 7 hours  Approvals:  Psychology ~ The Center for Story and Symbol is approved by the American Psychology Association to sponsor continuing education hours for psychologists. The Center maintains responsibility for these programs and their contents. CE hours are accepted by the California MCEP program. Full attendance is required for psychologists – No partial credit. The level is introductory for psychologists. 

MFT, LCSW, LPCC ~ California BBS Provider Number PCE 3903  RN ~ Provider approved by the Calif. Board of Registered Nursing, BRN Provider Number CEP 12477 

Teachers ~ Continuing Education courses are customarily approved by immediate supervisors. It is usually sufficient for teachers to attend on a non-credit (auditing) basis and present a receipt for the course. 

Facing Death Without Fear by Dr. Barry Kerzin

 

Friday, June 17, 2016, at 7 PM

California Lutheran University’s Samuelson Chapel

 

Many people spend considerable time worrying about their ultimate death, fearing the unknown yet trying to prepare for the occurrence. Knowledge and acceptance of death as the natural extension of life may provide some comfort on our journey. The process of death involves eight stages from the
Buddhist understanding. We will discuss and contemplate on these processes. Through understanding, what is happening as we die reduces fear. I will share some experiences of unusual deaths as a physician and Buddhist monk.”

Please get a free ticket, necessary for entry, at our Altruism in Medicine Institute website http://altruismmedicine.org.

1-day workshops are June 18 & 19 and June 25 & 26.
For more info, go to http://altruismmedicine.org.

The Role of Mysticism and Mystical Laws in Divination: The Revised New Art Tarot

SOLD OUT!

Saturday, April 2nd, 2016

10am – 1pm

This three-hour workshop will offer a succinct and practical approach to Hermetism using the Knapp-Hall Tarot, first published in 1929 and recently reprinted by the Philosophical Research Society. Dr. Yolanda Robinson, editor of the new edition, will explain the basic structure of the deck while emphasizing the role that mystery traditions play in understanding its mystical symbolism. The deck encapsulates the philosophy of Manly P. Hall as presented in his encyclopedic Opus, The Secret Teachings of All Ages. Participants will have an opportunity to work with the cards and understand how each Arcanum opens a personal portal that requires a subjective and intimate connection with Spirit. Divination is, after all, a way to access our own divinity and understand our role in forging our destiny. This will be an experiential workshop and you will need your own deck.

Workshop Objectives: 

  • Understand the mystical background of the Revised New Art Tarot through its basic Hermetic structure.
  • Learn to use the Tree of Life as a personal mandala that opens itself to intimate connections and interpretations. 
  • Approach divination as a magical alchemical tool for self-inquiry and potential personal transformation. 

Your Teacher:

Yolanda M. Robinson, Ph.D, has been researching Hermetic traditions and working with Tarot for over thirty years. She also specializes in shamanism and mystical traditions. Dr. Robinson is a retired Foreign Service Officer and is presently on the faculty of the University of Philosophical Research.  

 


The University of Philosophical Research

3910 Los Feliz Blvd. Los Angeles 90027

323.663.2167 ext.112

Nonduality & Western Psychology

 

An All-Day Workshop with Lionel Corbett & Leanne Whitney

Saturday, March 26th

In the nondual traditions, Reality is an undivided unity, and Consciousness is the Totality and ground of Being. Nondual philosophy provides a radically different view of reality than most of us have been led to perceive. Although we feel that we are individual egoic entities, because of our embodiment and our conditioning, nonduality suggests that this is an illusion; we are all manifestations of the same Consciousness. This workshop will describe the basic ideas of nondual spirituality found within traditions such as Advaita Vedanta, Buddhism, Classical Yoga, Taoism, and the teaching of J. Krishnamurti. We will contrast the nondual perspective with the western psychological tradition, focusing especially on Patanjali’s and Jung’s respective approaches to the psyche, especially the notions of the ego, the ego-Self axis, the conscious/unconscious dynamic, and synchronicity. Open to everyone.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the main difference between Eastern and Western approaches to consciousness
  2. Identify the areas where Western psychology meets its limits from the point of view of nondual ideas
  3. Explore synchronicity as a possible meeting ground between these tradition

 

Tuition

$85 credit/$70 non-credit

 

Credits

Continuing Education: 6 CE credits available, see Continuing Education page

PSYCHOLOGISTS

The C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The C.G. Jung Institute maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Please see the individual program for the number of CE credits awarded for each course. Full attendance is required for psychologists to receive credit; partial credit may not be awarded based on APA guidelines. Psychologists report directly to the MCEP using the certificates of attendance awarded at the completion of the course.

CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKERS AND MFTs

The C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles is accredited by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences to provide continuing education credits for LCSWs and MFCCs/MFTs (provider # PCE 318). Please see the individual program for the number of CE credits awarded for each course. Only the actual number of hours spent in the educational activity may be claimed for credit.

NURSES

The C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles is an accredited provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing (Provider #07986). Registered Nurses may claim only the actual number of hours spent in the educational activity for credit.

 

Day Schedule


10:00 Introduction to nondual philosophy

  • Reality as an undivided unity
  • Consciousness as the Ground

11:15 Break


11:30 The ego and the body in Western psychology and in nondual traditions

  • The ego as a construct
  • Psychophysical Being in the Classical Yoga Tradition
  • Nondual thinking; nondual perception; spontaneous presence

12:30 Lunch


1:30 Why is this dialog important?

  • Awakening as a natural process
  • Science and nonduality

2:00 Consciousness in Jung and Patañjali

  • The Jungian Self and the transformation of the God-image
  • The nondual Self and the discrimination of consciousness from the contents of consciousness
  • The conscious/unconscious dynamic

3:00 Break


3:30 Radical acceptance of suffering

  • Self-knowledge in reference to experiencing and witnessing suffering
  • The application of nonduality to psychotherapy and transformational practices

5:00 Course concludes


 

Lionel Corbett, M.D., trained in medicine and psychiatry in England and as a Jungian analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago. Dr. Corbett is a core faculty member at Pacifica Graduate Institute, teaching depth psychology, and a professor in the University of Philosophical Research. He is the author of Psyche and the Sacred: Spirituality Beyond Religion, The Religious Function of the Psyche, and The Sacred Cauldron: Psychotherapy as a Spiritual Practice. He is co-editor, with Dennis Patrick Slattery, of Depth Psychology: Meditations in the Field and Psychology at the Threshold: Selected Papers.    

Leanne Whitney, Ph.D., Trained in depth psychology, yoga, and craniosacral therapy, she works with clients one-on-one to resolve mental, emotional, and physical blocks which obscure the ever-present alignment of the authentic Self. She has taught the Reality of nonduality since 2009 and presents papers at domestic and international conferences on consciousness studies. Leanne and Dr. Lionel Corbett recently co-authored Jung and Nonduality: Some Clinical and Theoretical Implications of the Self as the Totality of the Psyche for the International Journal of Jungian Studies.

Nonduality & Western Psychology – Click for ticket options:

Secrets of the Silverscreen: Finding Wisdom in Cinema

Saturday, March 5th, 2016

A six-hour seminar with Jonathan Young and Anne Bach. 

Watching significant movies can be major life events, sometimes altering our perceptions of reality. This workshop will explore our reactions to major titles. Much of the information in a film is visual and reaches us on an emotional level. The symbolism can carry psychological implications. Many SciFi classics, like the Star Wars series, follow the hero’s journey described by Joseph Campbell. Tales of otherworldly contact could suggest discovery of our own inner wisdom. Powerful stories can show us who we are becoming. We will discuss the structure of films for personal significance. Dr. Young will draw on his work as a psychologist and screenplay consultant to reveal the insights to be gained from movies.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify how plot stages mirror key development tasks.
  2. Demonstrate how scenes from movies can be used to clarify specific life challenges.
  3. Explain the use of dream analysis methods to draw insights from favorite films.

Open to everyone. The course is not just for psychotherapists. It is open to all those interested in archetypal perspectives. The lectures are presented at the introductory level and require no background in mythology, narrative theory, or Jungian psychology. 


Instructors:

Jonathan Young, Ph.D., PSY10231, is a psychologist storyteller, and writer on mythic stories. He assisted mythologist Joseph Campbell at seminars and was the Founding Curator of the Joseph Campbell Archives and Library. His books and articles focus on personal mythology. Dr. Young is on the faculty of the University of Philosophical Research     

Anne Bach, M.S., MFT 38891 is a specialist in uses of writing in psychotherapy. She gives presentations on creativity as inner work at major conferences, and lectures widely on psychological dimensions of expressive writing. Her clinical background includes poetry therapy with residential mentally ill patients.   

Tuition: 

In person: $140 with CE credit   ~   $95 non-credit

Webinar: $95 with CE credit   ~   $45. non-credit

Day Schedule

9:30 am Checking-in begins in Bookstore

10:00 Introduction to archetypal symbolism in films

~ The cinema narrative as window to the unconscious

~ Gaining distance to reflect on pressing problems

11:15 Break (approximate time)

11:30 The quest story as developmental journey

~ How adult psychological challenges are presented in movie plots

~ Tapping resilience by identification with characters

12:30 Lunch Break

1:30 Story and symbol in cinematic narratives

~ Mythological understanding of the main genres of movies

2:30 Break (approximate time)

2:40 Unconscious dynamics and the mythic imagination

~ Using films like dreams – as mirrors of adult issues

~ Withdrawing identification with dysfunctional narratives

3:50 Break (approximate time)

4:00 Deepening the therapeutic relationship

~ Selecting appropriate videos for homework

~ Limits and cautionary considerations

5:00 Course concludes – Total 6 hours (RNs 7 hours)

CE Credit Information:

The material is presented at an introductory level, requiring no background in mythic studies, narrative theory, or Jungian psychology. Non-credit: Those not needing verification of attendance, such as teachers, writers, clergy, and artists – are welcome as non-credit attendees. Spouses, friends, students, and others not needing verification of attendance can also choose the lower non-credit tuition. 

Continuing Education hours are available for psychologists, marriage & family therapists, social workers, nurses, and other mental health professionals. The course meets CE requirements in most states. The certificate of completion will be provided by the Center for Story and Symbol. 

The following CE credits are available:

Psychology, MFT, LCSW, LPCC : 6 CE hours, Nursing: 7 hours. Most teachers must get credits approved by their school administration. Credits are provided by the Center for Story and Symbol. Center courses meet the requirements in most states. 

CE Hours: 

Psychology, MFT, LCSW, LPCC, Ed Psych: 6 CE hours   –   Nursing : 7 hours  Approvals:  Psychology ~ The Center for Story and Symbol is approved by the American Psychology Association to sponsor continuing education hours for psychologists. The Center maintains responsibility for these programs and their contents. CE hours are accepted by the California MCEP program. Full attendance is required for psychologists – No partial credit. The level is introductory for psychologists. 

MFT, LCSW, LPCC ~ California BBS Provider Number PCE 3903  RN ~ Provider approved by the Calif. Board of Registered Nursing, BRN Provider Number CEP 12477 

Teachers ~ Continuing Education courses are customarily approved by immediate supervisors. It is usually sufficient for teachers to attend on a non-credit (auditing) basis and present a receipt for the course. 

The day does not cover Law & Ethics

Secrets of the Silverscreen — Click for Tuition Options:

Solve et Coagula: Rescuing our true self through the art of Alchemy

SOLD OUT!

 

Saturday, November 21st  |  10am – 1pm

The University of Philosophical Research, 3910 Los Feliz Blvd.
Los Angeles, 90027

www.uprs.edu | info@uprs.edu 

Tickets are $25. (SOLD OUT!). 


Solve et Coagula (Dissolve and Coagulate) encapsulates the alchemical process of transformation that starts with Know Thyself and culminates in the allegorical Holy Grail or Philosopher’s Stone.  In this hands-on workshop Dr. Yolanda Robinson will be presenting the principal steps of alchemy while exploring the ways that circumstances and challenges in our lives become opportunities to explore the role that our shadow and our psychic field play in our personal transformation. We will approach the Art of Alchemy as a magical and hermetical tool as used by the esoteric traditions.

We encourage participants to bring a Tarot deck of their choice associated with Hermeticism, Cabala, Rosicrucianism, traditional Marseille, or other mystery schools. The concept behind this workshop is to offer an opportunity for the student of Hermeticism and Divination to prepare the appropriate stage for the winter solstice to become an active ground of meaningful transformation.


Yolanda M. Robinson, Ph.D., holds a Doctorate from the University of California in Los Angeles. She is a retired Foreign Service Officer, and has been researching Hermetic traditions and working with Tarot for over thirty years. Dr. Robinson is a graduate from Builders of the Adytum (B.O.T.A.), founded by Paul Foster Case, and holds a Master’s in Transformational Psychology from the University of Philosophical Research. She is presently conducting research on Hermeticism and Shamanism, and offers personal consultations in Los Angeles. Dr. Robinson is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Philosophical Research.

Inner Life of the Holidays: Symbols and Rituals of Renewal

 

Inner Life of the Holidays – Symbols and Rituals of Renewal 

Saturday, September 12th, 2015

A six-hour seminar with Jonathan Young and Anne Bach. As nights begin to grow longer, festivities stimulate the senses and stir poignant memories. Popular stories, customs, music and images are rich with nostalgia, awakening hopes for fulfillment. Archetypal aspects of such traditions can be guides to personal integration and psychological maturity.

This course investigates seasonal issues as opportunities for growth. Instruction includes coming to terms with emotional vulnerability, and self-care for those in helping professions. The main focus is on autumn and winter events, but other special days are considered as well, in this exploration of the psychological dimensions of gatherings and celebrations.

Open to everyone. The course is not just for psychotherapists. It is open to all those interested in archetypal perspectives. The lectures are presented at the introductory level and require no background in mythology, narrative theory, or Jungian psychology. 


Instructors:

Jonathan Young, Ph.D., PSY10231, is a psychologist storyteller, and writer on mythic stories. He assisted mythologist Joseph Campbell at seminars and was the Founding Curator of the Joseph Campbell Archives and Library. His books and articles focus on personal mythology. Dr. Young is on the faculty of the University of Philosophical Research     

Anne Bach, M.S., MFT 38891 is a specialist in uses of writing in psychotherapy. She gives presentations on creativity as inner work at major conferences, and lectures widely on psychological dimensions of expressive writing. Her clinical background includes poetry therapy with residential mentally ill patients.   

Tuition: 

In person: $140 with CE credit   ~   $95 non-credit

Webinar: $95 with CE credit   ~   $45. non-credit

Learning Objectives:

- Discuss psychological elements of festive gatherings.

- Explain how archetypal patterns appear in seasonal customs.

- Describe how life-stage issues are stimulated by holidays. 

- Detect how weather shifts impact inner experience.

- Assess underlying issues in holiday stress.

- Recognize how personal rituals can aid fulfillment. 

Day Schedule:

10:00: Underlying emotions in family gatherings

    – Expectations and realizations

    – Psychological dimensions of gift giving

11:15 – Break (approximate time)

11:30: Seasonal activities as yearning for illumination

    – Popular films as representations of nostalgia and longing

    – Effects of music, television, and public events

12:30 – Lunch Break

1:30: Winter rituals, religious observances, and symbolism

    – Traditions and their psychological dimensions

    – Archetypal readings of ancient images

2:30: Ancient stories and modern enactments

    – Familiar tales and personal renewal

    – How holidays influence personal mythology

3:00 - Break (approximate time)

4:00: Unconscious elements of the season

    – Hopes, losses, excesses and rewards

5:00 – Course concludes – Total 6 hours (RNs 7 hours)

CE Credit Information:

The material is presented at an introductory level, requiring no background in mythic studies, narrative theory, or Jungian psychology. Non-credit: Those not needing verification of attendance, such as teachers, writers, clergy, and artists – are welcome as non-credit attendees. Spouses, friends, students, and others not needing verification of attendance can also choose the lower non-credit tuition. 

Continuing Education hours are available for psychologists, marriage & family therapists, social workers, nurses, and other mental health professionals. The course meets CE requirements in most states. The certificate of completion will be provided by the Center for Story and Symbol. 

The following CE credits are available:

Psychology, MFT, LCSW, LPCC : 6 CE hours, Nursing: 7 hours. Most teachers must get credits approved by their school administration. Credits are provided by the Center for Story and Symbol. Center courses meet the requirements in most states. 

CE Hours: 

Psychology, MFT, LCSW, LPCC, Ed Psych: 6 CE hours   –   Nursing : 7 hours 

Approvals: 

Psychology ~ The Center for Story and Symbol is approved by the American Psychology Association to sponsor continuing education hours for psychologists. The Center maintains responsibility for these programs and their contents. CE hours are accepted by the California MCEP program. Full attendance is required for psychologists – No partial credit. The level is introductory for psychologists. 

MFT, LCSW, LPCC ~ California BBS Provider Number PCE 3903 

RN ~ Provider approved by the Calif. Board of Registered Nursing, BRN Provider Number CEP 12477 

Teachers ~ Continuing Education courses are customarily approved by immediate supervisors. It is usually sufficient for teachers to attend on a non-credit (auditing) basis and present a receipt for the course.   


Inner Life of the Holidays – Symbols and Rituals of Renewal

The Good Life: Reflecting on our Seasons

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September 13th, 2014 at the University of Philosophical Research

3910 Los Feliz Boulevard. Los Angeles, CA 90027

Tickets are no longer available online for this event. The webinar has reached capacity. To attend in person, please check-in inside the UPR Bookstore Saturday morning. Doors open at 9am.  Thank you!

Also Available as a Webinar for Those Residing Outside Los Angeles!!


*****

Great rewards come to those who study the inner life. As years go by, reflective practices can also help enrich connections with others. Having learned from abundant mistakes, we can navigate around some difficulties. We will ponder a story from Japanese folklore and Shakepeare’s The Tempest to illustrate accepting unique qualities and opening to creativity. This day is about savoring the harvest experience in adulthood and maturity. Enhanced self-knowledge is one of the benefits of age. While there can be challenges, adapting to changes creatively can deepen well-being. We will consider strategies for living authentically in the wisdom years. We can find ways to live in the deepest parts of ourselves, and be philosophical about life’s setbacks. In a spirit of play, we will reflect on the long adventure and celebrate the treasures.

Learning Objectives

Describe how life-story patterns shape experience.

Identify how developing authenticity can aid fulfillment.

Explain how maturity can deepen self-expression and relationships.

Day Schedule

9:30 – Checking-in (for those who attend on campus). Seminar begins promptly at 10:00.
10:00 – The wisdom archetypes
11:15 – Break (approximate time)
11:30 – Opening to new perspectives as the years pass
12:30 – Lunch Break
1:30 – Accepting rude surprises, losses, fragility, quirks
2:40 – Break (approximate time)
2:50 – How emerging archetypal roles build social connections
3:50 – Break (approximate time)
4:00 – Deepening, centering, and mentoring in later years
5:00 – Course concludes

Instructors:

young_and_roslynJonathan Young, PhD, PSY10231, is a psychologist storyteller, and writer on mythic stories. He assisted mythologist Joseph Campbell at seminars and was the Founding Curator of the Joseph Campbell Archives and Library. His books and articles focus on personal mythology. Dr. Young is on the faculty of the University of Philosophical Research

anne_art5

Anne Bach, M.S., MFT 38891 is a specialist in uses of writing in psychotherapy. She gives presentations on creativity as inner work at major conferences, and lectures widely on psychological dimensions of expressive writing. Her clinical background includes poetry therapy with seriously mentally ill patients.

 


CE Credit information

Continuing Education hours are available for psychologists, marriage & family therapists, social workers, nurses, and other mental health professionals. The course meets CE requirements in most states. The certificate of completion will be provided by the Center for Story and Symbol.

Non-credit: Those not needing verification of attendance, such as teachers, writers, clergy, and artists – are welcome as non-credit attendees. Spouses, friends, students, and others not needing verification of attendance can also choose the lower non-credit tuition.

CE Hours: Psychology, MFT, LCSW, LPCC, Ed Psych, NBCC: 6 CE hours   –   Nursing : 7 hours

Approvals:

Psychology ~ The Center for Story and Symbol is approved by the American Psychology Association to sponsor continuing education hours for psychologists. The Center maintains responsibility for these programs and their contents. CE hours are accepted by the California MCEP program. Full attendance is required for psychologists – No partial credit. The level is introductory for psychologists.

MFT, LCSW, LPCC ~ California BBS Provider Number PCE 3903

LPC, NBCC ~ The Center for Story and Symbol is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP solely is responsible for all aspects of the program. National Board for Certified Counselors Provider Number 6118.

RN ~ Provider approved by the Calif. Board of Registered Nursing, BRN Provider Number CEP 12477

Teachers ~ Continuing Education courses are customarily approved by immediate supervisors. It is usually sufficient to attend on a non-credit (auditing) basis and present a receipt for the course.


Open to everyone. The course is not just for psychotherapists. It is open to all those interested in archetypal perspectives. The lectures are presented at the introductory level and require no background in mythology, narrative theory, or Jungian psychology.

Tuition:

In person: $140 with CEU, $95, non-credit
Webinar: $95 with CEU, $45. non-credit

 

Bookstore Reading and Journal Submissions: Tuesday, August 19th!

 

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 Please join us for an evening of tea, conversation, and poetry in the UPR Bookstore!  We are pleased to announce that author, researcher, and UPR undergraduate faculty member, Sabrina Dalla Valle, will be reading from her lyrical memoir, 7 Days and Nights in the Desert (Tracing the Origin) the evening of Tuesday, August 19th. As an integral part of her creative and scholarly process, Sabrina will use this evening to share her knowledge on poetic method and how it connects with philosophical research.

About the book: Composed in a hybrid form that braids personal narrative with philosophical reflections, Sabrina Dalla Valle’s book ponders the complexities of human communication and perception. It time-travels from the historical present to the ancient past through the reverberating voices of the oldest known thinkers. Along the way, it reaches out to mirrored existences that are as fathomless as the infinitesimal connections between our cells. In her desert journal, philosopher’s notes take the form of old chants and tales that emerge anew as thought-scapes embodying a timeless ritual of gazing at the gods.

 


 

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▧▨▩  In conjunction with this event, we invite our Los Angeles  community to bring their creative work to share with one another and, if so inclined, submit them to UPR to be reviewed for publication in a digital Quarterly Arts Journal beginning this Fall quarter (with the commencement of our new B.A. in Liberal Studies program). We will accept material in the following areas: poetry, short fiction, reviews, 2D artworks (or 2D documentation of artworks), and multimedia (sound/video) works.

Each quarterly journal will trace a theme inextricably woven by the textures of the submissions received. A juried panel will locate the pattern inherent within each body of submissions, thus determining the title and context of that quarter’s journal. Submissions for the Fall publication will be accepted and reviewed until October 1st. Material may be submitted in person or online at: artsector@uprs.edu, subject: submission.

Please Note: The Arts Journal is to be a juried publication. Publication is not guaranteed upon submission.

 



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Sabrina Dalla Valle, MFA, is an experimental writer and researcher of integral awareness. Her work is anthologized in Best Poems of 2012 by Kore Press (2013) and in Alchemical Traditions by Numen Books (2013). Sabrina lives and works in Los Angeles. Sabrina will be teaching two courses in UPR’s Bachelor’s program on integral creativity and the ethnographic imagination. 

Please visit the following link to purchase a copy of 7 Days and Nights in the Desert

 

 

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