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Undergraduate Applications for Fall Quarter Due Monday, October 1st

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The Bachelor’s program offered by UPR is for those seeking to acquire a broad-based education in the Liberal Arts.  The program focuses on four main subject areas: Philosophy, Psychology, Culture and Religion. The university is an advanced educational institution and as such, prospective students must have completed an Associate of Arts degree or its equivalent of 90 quarter credits or 60 semester credits of lower division undergraduate study with a minimum GPA of 2.0.  The Bachelor of Arts degree requires a total of 180 quarter credits for completion.

Undergraduate students at UPR will need to complete 90 quarter credits of upper division coursework distributed over the four core areas of study (Philosophy, Psychology, Religion and Culture). Common themes across the curriculum will include: society and politics, science and technology, anthropology and cosmology, history and the creative arts, critical thinking, reading and writing skills. Focusing on the development of analytic and creative skills, this program underlines intersections among the selected academic disciplines so as to be cross-cultural, cross-temporal and contemporary.

 

The UPR Fall Quarter Begins October 27th.

 

Please send all application materials to:

The University of Philosophical Research

Admissions Office

3910 Los Feliz Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA. 90027

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The Essence of Vedanta

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    1. God is all there is OR there is nothing but God.
    2. God is all being – all that can be sensed, all that can be imagined, all that cannot be imagined.
    3. God exists as the totality of Being, including the known, the unknown and the unknowable; God also exists in/as every instance of being.
    4. God perceives him/her/itself in different gradations of objectivity – leading to a continuum of Being with gradations of Consciousness. 
    5. God as Subject is absolute Consciousness. It is known as Brahman. The power by which it perceives itself is known as Maya. The forms of objective self-perception have relative consciousness and are thus forms of Ignorance.
    6. God as Object is Matter. All the gradations of consciousness leading to and including the Consciousness of Subject are latent in the Object, just as all the gradations of consciousness leading to and including the Inconscience of the Object are latent in the Subject.
    7. God as Subject evolves towards greater and greater material perfection; Matter as Object evolves towards greater and greater spiritual perfection. These two evolutions are in fact one perpetual motion machine, an involution-evolution.
    8. Consciousness implies Sentience and Will. 
    9. The sentience of God Consciousness is absolute Bliss. The sentience of relative consciousness is the duality of pleasure and pain.
    10. God is thus absolute Being, absolute Consciousness, absolute Bliss (Sacchidananda), absolute Subject (Paramatman).
    11. The will of God Consciousness is Divine Will. The will of relative consciousness is the duality of will-towards-consciousness and will-towards-unconsciousness. 
    12. Will-towards-Consciousness is called Good; will-towards-unconsciousness is called Evil.
    13. Each instance of being is nothing but Being; but depending on its gradation of consciousness, it is relatively ignorant, relatively happy-and-unhappy and relatively good-and-evil.
    14. God as absolute Being, absolute Consciousness, absolute Bliss, absolute Subject – is also absolute Instance or Individual (Purushottama).
    15. Thus, though each individual instance of being (jiva, purusha), depending on its gradation of consciousness, is relatively ignorant, relatively happy-and-unhappy and relatively good-and-evil; this is a form of self-perception by the absolute Instance or Individual (Purushottama). Absolute Individual is thus the truth of the individual in the relative field, but is not realized as such by it.
    16. Forms of self perception by the absolute Individual (Purushottama) which are conscious of their identity with the absolute Individual, that is, innately realize the absolute Individual as their truth, and thus are not ignorant, always happy and always Good are known as the Gods (devas).
    17. Forms of self perception by the absolute Individual (Purushottama) which are far from conscious of their identity with the absolute Individual, and thus are ignorant, unhappy and Evil are known as the Demons (asuras).
    18. Thus devas and asuras or Good and Evil archetypes are not Absolute realities or instances but relative realities or instances based on the Absolute’s self-perception in terms of gradations of Consciousness.
    19. The existence of relative archetypes of Good and Evil sets up a polarity which causes a churning of the space of relative consciousness. 
    20. Archetypal forms of self-perception by the Absolute Being as Individual are innate and unchanging ; but there may be forms of self-perception by the Absolute Individual that are evolutionary.
    21. Whereas archetypal individualities (devas and asuras) cannot change their quality of consciousness or will (good or evil), evolutionary individualities have freedom of quality of consciousness and will and hence can act upon their own content and quality of consciousness with their will – i.e. a will-towards-consciousness or a will-towards-unconsciousness.
    22. For evolutionary individualities, the degree of freedom of quality of consciousness and will is dependent on the degree of individuality – that is in the continuum of Being with gradations of Consciouness, relative beings/individualities that can establish relations of consciousness with the Absolute Being/Individual partake of an increasing freedom of the quality of consciousness and will in realizing Absolute Being/Individual as their truth.
    23. The relations of consciousness that relative being/individuals can establish with Absolute Being/Individual are relations of Being, Knowledge, Love and Power.
    24. Absolute Being/Individual is incomprehensible to any relative being/individual but can disclose itself evolutionarily, progressively stretching the capacity of the relative being/individual towards realizations of identity with it in Being, Knowledge, Love and Power.
    25. Any relative being/individuality can relate to the absolute Being/individuality through one or more of its modes: the Absolute Being/Person, the Cosmic Being/Person known through its manifestation as  he many gods, any individual being/person that has realized its identity with absolute Being/Person (yogi, guru), an individual incarnation of Absolute Being/Person (avatar) or an invocation to absolute Being/Person through any individual object or instance (archa).

 

Hinduism Anyone.docx

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Debashish Banerji, author of book on Abanindranath Tagore

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DEBASHISH BANERJI, Ph.D.

Dean of Academic Affairs, University of Philosophical Research

Ph.D., Art History, University of California, Los Angeles.

Author of “The Alternate Nation of Abanindranath Tagore”

Author of “Seven Quartets of Becoming: A Transformative Yoga Psychology Based on the Diaries of Sri Aurobindo”

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UPR Professor Publishes Book Analyzing Sri Aurobindo Diaries

Seven Quartets of Becoming: A Transformative Yoga Psychology Based on the Diaries of Sri Aurobindo and written by Dr. Debashish BanerjiDr. Debashish Banerji, Dean of Academic Affairs, has published a new book entitled, Seven Quartets of Becoming: A Transformative Yoga Psychology Based on the Diaries of Sri Aurobindo.

Seven Quartets of Becoming is an analysis of the diaries which Sri Aurobindo maintained for some years after he arrived in Pondicherry in 1910, and which were published much later in two volumes as Record of Yoga. The book outlines the system of experimental yogic practice that Sri Aurobindo followed and recorded in his diary notes. The notes form a type of scientist’s log tracing a complex psychological experiment carried out with himself as the subject. Sri Aurobindo called this schema of seven lines of practice the sapta chatushtaya, which the author has translated as the Seven Quartets. These seven aspects of yogic practice are peace, power, knowledge, body, being, action, and integration. Banerji outlines the system comprising these seven aspects of yogic practice – peace, power, knowledge, body, being, action, and integration –, pointing out correlations and elaborations in some of Sri Aurobindo’s later writings, such as The Synthesis of Yoga, The Mother, and his last written prose work, The Supramental Manifestation Upon Earth. The author begins his study with the quartet of integration or integral perfection, the siddhi chatushtaya, which takes up the general elements of perfection:

Emphasising the overarching nature of this quartet, Sri Aurobindo alternately named it yoga chatushtaya or the quartet of yoga. We see that he enumerated the goals of this quartet as shuddhi, mukti, bhukti and siddhi. These terms Sri Aurobindo himself translated broadly as: purification, liberation, enjoyment and perfection, respectively. Of these, we may say that the core, the meaning of the quartet of perfection, and of what Sri Aurobindo considered the goal of his own yoga, is to be found in the two central elements: mukti and bhukti (liberation and enjoyment).

The chapter continues by stressing that the primary pre-requisite for a perfect liberation and a perfect enjoyment is purification, and by drawing out the different elements of the yogic psychology which need to be purified. The elements of the nervous being, the will, the emotional being, and the various aspects of the mind are to be subjected to the purifying power of equality. The importance of equality is underlined by Sri Aurobindo by his turning this discipline into the first of the specific yogic practices, the shanti chatushtaya, the quartet of peace, or the perfection of equality.

While the author’s primary objective throughout the book is to understand the processes and goals of the integral transformation of being and nature in Sri Aurobindo’s Record of Yoga, he also seeks to understand its place in relation to traditional systems of yoga. In addition, he is looking for an approach that will interpret this field of yoga, a psychology of process aimed at integral transformation, in the context of the ongoing progress of contemporary psychology and philosophy and firmly situates the system presented in the Seven Quartets as a transformational yoga psychology. Finally, he states that part of his objective “is to gain a key, an opening, to understanding the inner life of Sri Aurobindo through the Record of Yoga, seen as a lived example, that we can learn from, and derive inspiration from, for success in experimental practice”.

Seven Quartets of Becoming: A Transformative Yoga Psychology Based on the Diaries of Sri Aurobindo can be purchased directly through the publisher: D.K. Printworld

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