This Advent Season: Born Divine

Born_Divine

The tradition of Advent translates directly in Latin to “coming,” specifically in this season to the four Sundays preceding the arrival of baby Jesus as written in the Bible all those winters ago. In celebration of this tradition, UPR President Dr. Obadiah Harris has compiled four essays reflecting on the true meaning of Christmas, as a small booklet titled The Birth of Christ available online as both an e-book and pamphlet.

UPR would like to share each essay every Sunday preceding Christmas with our students and online community as a gift this year. The first of these essays titled, Born Divine, is available here below:

 


 

Obadiah Harris is the founder and president of the University of Philosophical Research. Harris has a long and storied career in both mainstream academia and the American metaphysical culture. He holds a Ph.D. in education administration and supervision from the University of Michigan and an MA in education from Arizona State University, where he was an associate professor of education and director of community education.

He is the author of multiple books, including his most recent title, The Simple Road: A Handbook for the Contemporary Seeker published this year by Tarcher/Penguin.

A Thanksgiving Prayer

Thanksgiving

 

On this Thanksgiving, the greatest gift for which we can express gratitude is the certainty of the advent of a larger spiritual existence that is leading the earth to the oneness of mankind, to a divine age on earth. It is this that makes the future of mankind one of joy and not sorrow. It is this which enables us at this Thanksgiving Day to look to the days ahead no with foreboding but assurance. God will say to us as He did through Moses to the ancient Hebrews after he had brought them out of slavery in Egypt: You have seen how I bore you on eagles’ wings and brought you unto myself. (Exodus 10:3)

That is the vision of America that has justified the hopes of our forefathers, and of which our nation stands as a living and enduring example. Hundreds of years ago on these shores they reverently thanked God on this holiday for preserving them and the liberty for which they crossed the stormy seas to a new and more bountiful land. We thank God that He has preserved us in liberty to this very hour. Through God’s grace may this spiritual vision re-cross the seas from these American shores to the ends of the earth.

Obadiah Harris 

An Examined Life: In Search of the Ground of Being

 UPR is pleased to announce the publication of Dr. Richard Geldard’s newest book:

AN EXAMINED LIFE

In Search of the Ground of Being

Richard G. Geldard

image001

When Socrates famously said that the unexamined life was not worth having, his declaration begged the question what, then, was an examined life? And when his student Plato described the prisoners in the cave living an unexamined life, philosophy began to speak of a life lived consciously and reflectively rather than mechanically and habitually.

This book is part personal description of an examined life and part challenge to the reader to develop the means to awaken to a life lived consciously and reflectively. It was Henry Thoreau who set a high standard for the examined life when he wrote, “I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and to see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”

That is the challenge, and the gifts to come are the rewards from the effort.

“Richard Geldard’s personal quest for a meaningful life has taken him all the way from the PreSocratics to Gurdjieff and back again, but the life-line tying it all together has for many years been the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Geldard is a serious philosophical reader of Emerson, and he is a gifted teacher and writer and thinker able to reach any good modern reader willing to give it a shot. Geldard’s deeply moving and unflinchingly personal account puts him in that small circle of important philosophical Emersonians that includes Stanley Cavell and George Kateb. This is a lovely book.” – Robert D. Richardson, author of Emerson: The Mind on Fire

Visit http://www.rgbooks.com/ to purchase this newest release.

 

Professor Richard Geldard, Ph.D. is a member of the UPR and Holmes Institute faculties. He teaches courses in Ancient Greek Thought, New England Transcendentalism, Hermeticism, and The Examined Life. He is the author of a dozen books, the latest being “The Soul’s Journey,” His web site is www.rgbooks.com.

 

Understanding the World’s Religions Lecture Recordings

Worlds_Religions_Archive

 

Lecture 1: Tuesday October 25, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

Perspectives on Religions
Beginnings are important to a religion—and to studying it. One of the best ways to understand a phenomenon as complex as religion is to begin simply, in this case with etymology, the origin and history of the word itself.  We will also explore the five lenses we will use to study religion: the sacred, myth, ritual, community, and the individual.

 

Lecture 2: Tuesday November 1, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

The Sacred in Native American Religions
The oldest religions on earth can be found in contemporary expressions of indigenous traditions. In the face of globalisms old and new, their resilience is astonishing, and some of their adaptations are immensely creative. Their understandings of sacred space and time both predate and influence our own. Centered on the landscape and oral storytelling, these traditions represent a religious perspective that is unique and integrative.

 

Lecture 3: Tuesday November 8, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

Myth in Hinduism
Like indigenous religions, Hinduism contains traces of religious belief that antedate it by incalculable years. Hinduism emerged from these earlier beliefs and practices to create the oldest institutional religion on earth. Much of its vitality is found in its sacred texts and myths, which include deep philosophical ruminations, songs, epic poems, and manuals for the performance of rituals. We will examine Hinduism through the lens of myth, specifically, in terms of its nature and functions. 

 

Lecture 4: Tuesday November 15, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

Ritual in Buddhism
Buddhism is a branch of Hinduism that developed into its own, full-fledged religion, and it is in part a set of rituals that is uniquely centered in the body, from its beginnings in its founder’s early asceticism to its ritual practices of meditation. One of the most widespread and eclectic religions, Buddhism has many incarnations across the world. We will examine Buddhism through the lens of ritual, specifically, the body, symbol, and magic.

 

Lecture 5: Tuesday November 29, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

Community in Chinese Religions
For much of its existence, Chinese culture was closed to other cultures, especially Western cultures. As the Chinese gazed inward, they focused religiously on domestic balance and harmony. All of these religions see ethical practice, relationships, and the maintenance of institutions as the highest expressions of the sacred. We will examine Chinese religions through the lens of community, specifically, ethics and institutions.

 

Lecture 6: Tuesday December 6, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

The Individual in Zoroastrianism
Often overlooked even in world religions courses, Zoroastrianism has been a pivotal religion in the development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, contributing much of its ideas of individuality and eschatology to them while retaining a small but dedicated group of adherents even today. Unique rituals and concepts combine to make Zoroastrianism one of the most influential and interesting world religions. We will examine Zoroastrianism through the lens of the individual, specifically, salvation and the afterlife.

 

Lecture 7: Tuesday December 13, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

The Sacred in Judaism One of the oldest living religions, Judaism offers a unique perspective on identity and tradition by virtue of its anthropomorphic deity and vital traditions. In addition to thriving despite millennia of persecution, Judaism has given birth to other religions, notably Christianity. We will examine Judaism through the lens of the sacred, specifically, anthropomorphism and tradition.

 

Lecture 8: Tuesday December 20, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

Myth in Christianity Christianity begins by taking another religion’s story as its own, then adding a global, evangelical element. As such, Christianity’s story has been at the center of its history and practice, even with radically diverse versions of it. We will examine Christianity through the lens of myth, specifically, its forms and relationships.

 

Ritual and Islam: A religion that was effectively “the world religion” for much of the Middle Ages, Islam is unique in its focus on practices, whether it is the pilgrimage to Mecca (the hajj) or one of the other five pillars. We will examine Islam through the lens of ritual, specifically, rites of passage and communitas.


Greg_Salyer

Greg Salyer is the Dean of Students at the University of Philosophical Research and has been a teacher and administrator in higher education for almost twenty-five years. He has a Ph.D. in Literary Theory, Contemporary Literature, and Religious Studies from Emory University’s Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts and has taught in many venues, from small liberal arts colleges to a major research university, and also online since 2000. He has taught world religions at most of these schools and has developed a unique approach to the subject, one that uses five “lenses” from the discipline of religious studies to examine particular religions.

 

UPR on Campus—Understanding the World’s Religions

Worlds_Religions_Archive

Beginning Tuesday, October 25th, UPR professor Dr. Greg Salyer will offer a weekly public lecture and discussion series at UPR. Touching upon the tremendous diversity of religious traditions practiced across the globe, Dr. Salyer will utilize universal notions such as myth, ritual, the idea of the sacred, and community to weave a rich tapestry of thought and discussion in order to strengthen our understanding of the world’s religions. $10 suggested donation per lecture (we ask that you try and reserve your ticket in advance so that we can best accommodate each class)

Lectures will take place in the Auditorium. Please check-in inside our bookstore. Bookstore hours are extended until 9pm on lecture nights

All lectures are being recorded and will be made available online at the following link

Greg Salyer is the Dean of Students at the University of Philosophical Research and has been a teacher and administrator in higher education for almost twenty-five years. He has a Ph.D. in Literary Theory, Contemporary Literature, and Religious Studies from Emory University’s Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts and has taught in many venues, from small liberal arts colleges to a major research university, and also online since 2000. He has taught world religions at most of these schools and has developed a unique approach to the subject, one that uses five “lenses” from the discipline of religious studies to examine particular religions.

Lecture 1: Tuesday October 25, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

Perspectives on Religions

Beginnings are important to a religion—and to studying it. One of the best ways to understand a phenomenon as complex as religion is to begin simply, in this case with etymology, the origin and history of the word itself.  We will also explore the five lenses we will use to study religion: the sacred, myth, ritual, community, and the individual.

Lecture 2: Tuesday November 1, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

The Sacred in Native American Religions

The oldest religions on earth can be found in contemporary expressions of indigenous traditions. In the face of globalisms old and new, their resilience is astonishing, and some of their adaptations are immensely creative. Their understandings of sacred space and time both predate and influence our own. Centered on the landscape and oral storytelling, these traditions represent a religious perspective that is unique and integrative.

Lecture 3: Tuesday November 8, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

Myth in Hinduism

Like indigenous religions, Hinduism contains traces of religious belief that antedate it by incalculable years. Hinduism emerged from these earlier beliefs and practices to create the oldest institutional religion on earth. Much of its vitality is found in its sacred texts and myths, which include deep philosophical ruminations, songs, epic poems, and manuals for the performance of rituals. We will examine Hinduism through the lens of myth, specifically, in terms of its nature and functions. 

Lecture 4: Tuesday November 15, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

Ritual in Buddhism

Buddhism is a branch of Hinduism that developed into its own, full-fledged religion, and it is in part a set of rituals that is uniquely centered in the body, from its beginnings in its founder’s early asceticism to its ritual practices of meditation. One of the most widespread and eclectic religions, Buddhism has many incarnations across the world. We will examine Buddhism through the lens of ritual, specifically, the body, symbol, and magic.

Lecture 5: Tuesday November 29, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

Community in Chinese Religions

For much of its existence, Chinese culture was closed to other cultures, especially Western cultures. As the Chinese gazed inward, they focused religiously on domestic balance and harmony. All of these religions see ethical practice, relationships, and the maintenance of institutions as the highest expressions of the sacred. We will examine Chinese religions through the lens of community, specifically, ethics and institutions.

Lecture 6: Tuesday December 6, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

The Individual in Zoroastrianism

Often overlooked even in world religions courses, Zoroastrianism has been a pivotal religion in the development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, contributing much of its ideas of individuality and eschatology to them while retaining a small but dedicated group of adherents even today. Unique rituals and concepts combine to make Zoroastrianism one of the most influential and interesting world religions. We will examine Zoroastrianism through the lens of the individual, specifically, salvation and the afterlife.

Lecture 7: Tuesday December 13, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

The Sacred in Judaism

One of the oldest living religions, Judaism offers a unique perspective on identity and tradition by virtue of its anthropomorphic deity and vital traditions. In addition to thriving despite millennia of persecution, Judaism has given birth to other religions, notably Christianity. We will examine Judaism through the lens of the sacred, specifically, anthropomorphism and tradition.

Lecture 8: Tuesday December 20, 2016 (7:00-8:30pm)

Myth in Christianity

Christianity begins by taking another religion’s story as its own, then adding a global, evangelical element. As such, Christianity’s story has been at the center of its history and practice, even with radically diverse versions of it. We will examine Christianity through the lens of myth, specifically, its forms and relationships.

Lecture 9: Tuesday January 3, 2017 (7:00-8:30pm)

Ritual in Islam

A religion that was effectively “the world religion” for much of the Middle Ages, Islam is unique in its focus on practices, whether it is the pilgrimage to Mecca (the hajj) or one of the other five pillars. We will examine Islam through the lens of ritual, specifically, rites of passage and communitas.

Lecture 10: Tuesday January 10, 2017 (7:00-8:30pm)

Community in Sikhism, Bahá’í and New Age Religions

Religions tend to present themselves in exclusive fashion, even as they adapt to include other cultural elements, but Sikhism and Bahá’í are two religions that successfully adapt and include other religions. Sikhism blends Hinduism and Islam, Bahá’í incorporates all of the world’s religions in a fascinating mixture, while New Age Religions are eclectic by their very nature. We will examine these religions through the lens of syncretism and eclecticism.

Fall Quarter Begins

Fall_Post

Each morning we are born again. What we do today is what matters most. -Buddha

With the first half of the year complete, we now begin to evaluate all that we’ve accomplished thus far and what is yet to come. Maybe our goals have shifted and we are reevaluating just how to approach this life, or maybe we are now just remembering our true calling and are ready to take it all on. Whatever the case, here at UPR we believe that now is the time to move forward and evolve into the very best we can be. Every book, every teacher, every experience is an opportunity for transformation and conscious expansion. The interconnectivity and wisdom that students are immersed in while studying at UPR is truly one-of-a-kind. As artists and musicians, scientists and psychologists, our students are inspired and guided by their studies here at UPR to be the best they can be, to create a better world for all of us.

If you have been thinking of enrolling in one of our programs, now is the time to begin the application process. Our offices are open Monday-Friday at 10am-4pm Pacific time. Give us a call during these hours at 323.663.2167 or email us at info@uprs.edu and a university representative will be happy to assist you.

 

Here’s what we’re offering this upcoming fall quarter:

M.A. courses:

PHI 503 – The Birth of Consciousness in Early Greek Thought
PHI 513 – Mind in the Cosmos: The Evolution of Consciousness
PHI 514 – Determinism, Reductionism and Final Causes in Physics
REL 522 – Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita
PSY 503 – Self Regulation: Foundation of Human Potential
PSY 504 – Introduction to Relational Gestalt
PSY 512 – Mythic Stories in Depth Psychology
PSY 515 – Tarot and Transformation

Clicking in any of these will take you to the course page with a sample video. Further detail on the courses and faculty can be found at: graduate-academics

 

MLA Style Guide

MLA_Banner

For both our Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree programs, UPR students will now be expected to use the Modern Language Association (MLA) style guide for all written assignments rather than the American Psychological Association (APA) style. The MLA is the style guide more applicable for our programs. All new students must refer to the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers 8th Edition as they develop papers and/or the Master’s thesis. Currently enrolled students have an option to continue with the APA style or may adopt to the MLA style. Students may also find a link to the MLA style guide in the UPR Research Toolkit.

 

 

Saturday Bookstore & Library Hours

Bookstore

Our Bookstore and Library will be open the 2nd Saturday of October, November, and December in preparation for our upcoming 2017 2nd Saturday Speaker’s Platform and the approaching Holiday Season.

Saturday 10/8/16: Bookstore & Library open 10am-4pm

Saturday 11/12/16: Bookstore & Library open 10am-4pm

Saturday 12/10/16: Bookstore & Library open 10am-4pm

The Research Library will limit occupancy to 10 visitors at a time.


Our Bookstore is always open Monday to Friday from 10am to 4pm. Come visit us and browse our selection of new and used books spanning an expansive array of subjects and interests from Alchemy and Alternative Healing to Depth Psychology, Mythology and Buddhist Studies…As well as a selection of incense, gem stones, symbolic prints and tarot decks

We offer literature and catalogs for all of our online degree programs as well as select textbooks and course albums for audit and independent study.

We are also the original home of an in-depth selection of works published by the Philosophical Research Society spanning from the 1930s to recent releases. Click here to view PRS Publications.

Questions? Contact us at: 323.663.2167 ext.116, bookstore@uprs.edu

Radio Interview with Dr. Obadiah Harris

Common_Sense

Tune in this Friday, September 9th to hear UPR President Dr. Obadiah Harris discuss the topic of spirituality expounding upon his wealth of experience as a devoted author, educator, and spiritual seeker with host David Gaggin.

The “Common Sense Spirituality Show” will air this Friday at 9am Eastern/ 6am Pacific on W4CY and WVET. Please use link http://w4cy.com/ to listen in and share with your online communities. The podcast is usually made available on iHeart Radio the Monday following the airing.

The Common Sense Spirituality Show discusses spiritual issues ranging from topics like karma, reincarnation, souls and faith to the nature of mankind and the purpose of life. The show considers religious, scientific and metaphysical views and seeks to help the listeners expand their consciousness by finding life’s most plausible answers. Host David Gaggin, is a former Boeing engineer, Army & NASA Director, life long researcher into mankind’s greatest mysteries, and author of The Endless Journey.

Obadiah Harris is the founder and president of the University of Philosophical Research. Harris has a long and storied career in both mainstream academia and the American metaphysical culture.  He holds a Ph.D. in education administration and supervision from the University of Michigan and an MA in education from Arizona State University, where he was an associate professor of education and director of community education.

He is the author of multiple books, including his most recent title, The Simple Road: A Handbook for the Contemporary Seeker published this year by Tarcher/Penguin.

A Letter From the Dean

Dean_Welcome

 

 

From the President:

I would like to welcome and introduce you to a new professor and administrator at our university.  He is Dr. Greg Salyer who will also serve as Dean of Students. He comes to us with a Ph.D. in Literature and Religious Studies from Emory University. His experience includes many years working in higher education administration – most recently Dr. Salyer developed an undergraduate program at Boston University. He is totally at home at UPR where integral philosophy and wisdom literature are emphasized with all programs. He is comfortable with online coursework as he has a decade of teaching experience using this format.

We are delighted to have Dr. Salyer with us. You will enjoy him too.

Obadiah Harris, Ph.D.

President

University of Philosophical Research

 

Greg_SalyerDear Students, Friends, and Faculty at the University of Philosophical Research,

I tend to interpret my life in terms of literature, especially mythology. When I think of my professional journeys, I always think of Odysseus, Homer’s reluctant hero who travels far and experiences much. It’s been a fascinating journey with not a few gods and monsters along the way. I’m pleased to add the University of Philosophical Research to this trek, where it feels as if I have come home.

My journey has included numerous teaching and administrative positions from small liberal arts colleges to major research universities. I have written and presented on a variety of topics in literature, philosophy, and religion. My first online course was in 2000, and I have taught online in one form or another since then. It is a fascinating time in higher education, and I look forward to being a part of UPR and its contributions to new and vital ways of learning wisdom.

And I look forward to learning from and with you. Already, I have seen that the UPRS community is unique. Competencies and credentialing are important, and we certainly celebrate both. More important than those, however, is wisdom, which is your goal (and mine). Wisdom is the story behind every story, the presence behind every argument, and the alpha and omega of life itself. I congratulate you on choosing to seek wisdom and to do so along this unique and communal path that is the University of Philosophical Research. It is my great pleasure to join you.

 

Greg Salyer, Ph.D.

Dean of Students

The University of Philosophical Research

 

 

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