Dreams And The Quest For Meaning – PSY 513

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course explores the vast and eternally mysterious realm of human dream experience. The class will focus special attention on the profound influence of dreaming on the world’s religious and spiritual traditions, for dreaming can truly be said to represent a primal wellspring of religious experience, insight and wisdom. Each of the first seven lectures concentrates on one particular area and/or tradition (the Ancient Near East, Judaism, Ancient Greece, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Native American cultures) and describes the surprisingly sophisticated dream beliefs and practices of these “pre-modern” peoples. The eighth lecture highlights the revolutionary discoveries of two great 20th century dream psychologists Sigmund Freud and C.G. Jung, and the ninth lecture describes the equally revolutionary findings make in just the past few years regarding the neuropsychological functioning of the brain/mind system during sleep and dreaming. The tenth and final lecture looks to the future of dream research, with exciting prospects for a better understanding of the amazing power of dreams to inspire creativity, heal illness, anticipate future possibilities, and promote spiritual development.

 

 

COURSE SESSIONS AND TOPICS

This course is divided into ten, one-hour sessions. The introductory session, Introduction – Dreaming in the Ancient Near East is presented in both audio and video format to better acquaint the student with the instructor.

Session 1 | Introduction. Dreaming in the Ancient Near East
Session 2 | Dreaming in Judaism
Session 3 | Dreaming in Ancient Greece
Session 4 | Dreaming in Christianity
Session 5 | Dreaming in Islam
Session 6 | Dreaming in Buddhism
Session 7 | Dreaming in Native American Culture
Session 8 | Dreaming in 20th Century Psychology: Freud and Jung
Session 9 | Dreaming in 21st Century Neuroscience
Session 10 | New Horizons in the Study of Dreams


LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR THIS COURSE

Outcome 1:  Students are able to describe the diversity of
beliefs and practices regarding dreams around the world.

Outcome 2: Students are able to recognize and describe the common
themes in cross-cultural and historical approaches to dreaming.

Outcome 3: Students are able to recognize and describe the connections
between our dream experiences today and the dreams of other people.

Outcome 4: Students are able to recognize and describe those qualities
that make our dreams in 21st century Western culture different from
other people’s dreams through history.

Outcome 5: Students are able to describe the conflicts and disagreements
among dream researchers from different disciplines and theoretical orientations.

Outcome 6: Students are able to recognize and describe the similarities and
differences between modern Western psychology and cognitive neuroscience
and the world’s religious traditions in their approaches to dreaming.

Outcome 7: Students are able to articulate their own understanding of the origins,
function(s), and meaning of dreams and describe how this impacts the role of
dreaming in their personal lives and in the broader community.


PROFESSOR

Kelly Bulkeley, Ph.D. – Religion and Psychological Studies, University of Chicago Divinity School. He is a Visiting Scholar at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California, and Director of the Dream Studies Program at JFK University. Author of several books on dreams, religion, and psychology, including: The Wilderness of Dreams, An Introduction to the Psychology of Dreaming, Visions of the Night, and Dreams of Healing. Dr. Bulkeley is a former President of the Association for the Study of Dreams, and Secretary-Treasurer of the Person, Culture and Religion Group of the American Academy of Religion. He is on the editorial boards of the journals Dreaming, Religious Studies Review, and Sleep and Hypnosis.

 

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PURCHASE AUDIO / VIDEO

The lecture series from this course is also available for independent study.
>> Click Here to order these course materials.

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