Mythic Stories in Depth Psychology – PSY 512

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Wisdom stories reflect a broad range of human concerns. This course is an exploration of psychological functions of the mythic imagination. Initiatory patterns drawn from ancient narratives appear in movies and other cultural forms that reveal our aspirations. We will examine familiar mystery tales to study archetypal elements that shape experience, role and social contributions. We will also consider how mythic narratives reflect pluralistic models of psychological life.

The latest incarnation of Oedipus, the continued romance of Beauty and the Beast, stands this afternoon on the corner of 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue, waiting for a traffic light to change.” —Joseph Campbell

 

 

COURSE SESSIONS AND TOPICS

This course is divided into ten, one-hour sessions. The introductory session, Mythic Stories in Depth Psychology is presented in both audio and video format to better acquaint the student with the instructor.

Session 1 - Mythic Stories in Depth Psychology - Cinderella
Session 2 - Moments of Transformation - The Frog King
Session 3 - The Journey of Initiation - The Wizard of Oz
Session 4 - The Trickster - Robin Hood
Session 5 - Mentors and Benefactors - The Talking Eggs
Session 6 - The Belly of the Beast - Little Red Riding Hood
Session 7 - The Dark Forest - Hansel and Gretel
Session 8 - The Beloved of the Soul - Rapunzel
Session 9 - The Search for Meaning - Yvaine and the Grail Story
Session 10 - Claiming Your Story - The Ugly Duckling


LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR THIS COURSE

Outcome 1:  Students will be able to recognize and describe the principles
and theories of archetypal symbolism as found in wisdom tales.

Outcome 2:  Students will be able to describe how the terms and symbolic constructs
from folklore and mythology can be utilized to understand inner experience.

Outcome 3:  Students will be able to describe the basic tenets of initiatory
stages and how traditional stories reflect major life-stage transitions.

Outcome 4:  Students will be able to articulate how reflecting
on stories can aid in integration of competing goals.

Outcome 5:  Students will be able to describe how stories
can help us come to terms with difficult experiences.


PROFESSOR

Jonathan Young, Ph.D. – Clinical Psychology, Alliant International University, San Diego. Storyteller and psychologist, Dr. Young assisted Joseph Campbell at seminars and was the founding curator of the Joseph Campbell Archives and Library. His books and articles focus on personal mythology. Creator and former chair of the Mythological Studies at the Pacifica Graduate Institute, Dr. Young is now director of the Center for Story and Symbol in Santa Barbara, California.

 

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PURCHASE AUDIO / VIDEO

The lecture series from this course is also available for independent study.
>> Click Here to order these course materials.

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