Understanding The Bible – REL 511

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course explores an alternative approach to the Bible’s essential teachings in its spiritual, literary and poetic significance. The goal is to understand how the Biblical words came to those who first heard them as well as how we understand them today. Before anyone asks what does the Bible say, one should first ask what did it say. Until one puts on the sandals of a first century person and hears the biblical word as it was first announced, one may not fully grasp its meaning.

 


COURSE SESSIONS AND TOPICS

This course is divided into ten, one-hour sessions. The introductory session,  On Mything the Point is presented in both audio and video format to better acquaint the student with the instructor.

Session 1  – On Mything the Point
Session 2  – Exodus and the Struggle for Identity
Session 3  – Biblical History and the Stewardship of the Land
Session 4 – Politics, Prophets and Profits: When Insight is More Human Than Foresight
Session 5 – Ethic and Ethical—Race Religion and Human Reality
Session 6 – Sage and Saint: On Making Room for Diversity & Eccentricity
Session 7 – Orality, Memory and Tradition: The Synoptic Gospels and Interpreted History
Session 8 – Paul and the Christ Myth—The Movement and the Man: a New Consciousness
Session 9 – John and Revelation: Several Johns, a Gospel and a Revelation
Session 10 – The Man From Galilee: The Historic Jesus—a Parable Maker


LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR THIS COURSE

Outcome 1:  Students will be able to recognize and describe key concepts relating
to the Bible in its entirety, and recognize and describe the historical origins of its books
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Outcome 2:  Students will be able to describe how stories, folklore, values and history
in the Bible have influenced Western cultural development.

Outcome 3:  Students will be able to describe the meaning of Bible stories, parables
and instructions based on the cultural context in which they were originated.
The student will be able to compare and contrast the original meanings of these
stories to the way they may be understood in the student’s culture.

Outcome 4:  Students will be able to explain Biblical material without historically
or spiritually misinterpreting the original intent of the authors of the various books.

 

PROFESSOR

Culver Nelson, D.D. – Pacific School of Religion. Adjunct Professor, Pacific School of Religion, and Arizona State University. Fellow, Jesus Seminar. Editor, “The Fourth R.”

 

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PURCHASE AUDIO / VIDEO

The lecture series from this course is also available for independent study.
>> Click Here to order these course materials.

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