Introduction to Religions of the World (REL 301)

Introduction to Religions of the World (REL 301)

Course Description

This course offers a review of all the great spiritual traditions of the world.  Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism are introduced with emphasis on both Judeo-Christian and Eastern thought on consciousness.

 Course Sessions and Topics

This course is divided into ten, one-hour lectures. The introductory lecture, Understanding the World’s Religious Heritage is presented in both audio and video format to better acquaint the student with the instructor.

Week 1    |  Understanding the World’s Religious Heritage

Week 2    |   Prehistoric and Tribal Religions

Week 3     | Hinduism

Week 4     |  Buddhism

Week 5     |  East Asian Religions

Week 6     |  Monotheism and Judaism

Week 7     |  Christianity

Week 8     |   Islam

Week 9    |   New Religious Movements

Week 10   |  World Religion Today and Tomorrow

Learning Outcomes for this Course

Outcome 1: Students will be able to meet all of the objectives identified at the beginning of EACH chapter in the text: Many Peoples, Many Faiths, as they are assigned weekly.

Outcome 2: Students will be able to differentiate the fundamental beliefs, ideologies, and practices associated with each religion presented in the course.

Outcome 3: Students will be able to identify ways in which each religion presented in the course establishes initiation in its customs and structures.

Outcome 4: Students will be able to identify correctly the different modes of enlightenment or spiritual accomplishment within each representative belief system presented in the course.

Outcome 5: Students will be able to describe the different insights and experiences induced within each religious custom.

Outcome 6: Students will be able to discuss how each religion studied in the couse is practiced and refined.

Outcome 7: Students will be able to cross analyze and describe how many of the religions presented in the course are connected historically and idealogically to create well informed perspectives on world religions and encourage further study into the nature of culture and belief.

Outcome 8: Students will analyze a visit to a religious service and institution in terms of the interaction of the three forms of religious expression — theoretical or teaching; practical or worship, and personal devotion; sociological or the role of leadership, social interaction, demographics and institutional structure.

Your Professor

This course was created and recorded by:

Robert Ellwood, Ph.D. | History of Religion, University of Chicago Divinity School. Dr. Ellwood is the Emeritus Professor of Religion, University of Southern California. Author of 22 books, including: Many People, Many Faiths, The Pilgrim Self, and The Fifties Spiritual Marketplace. 

This course will be administered and graded by:

Athena Kolinski, M.A. | Consciousness Studies, University of Philosophical Research.  2005,  M.A. Interdisciplinary Studies,  California State University, Northridge.  B.A., Religious Studies, California State University Northridge

 

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